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Infection Control

Lennox and Addington County General Hospital takes your care and your safety very seriously.  To keep you informed of the results of our safety initiatives, we will be reporting our C. difficile infection rates on our website monthly.  Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin Resistant Entercoccus (VRE), Central Line Infection (CLI) rates will be reported quarterly.  Hand Hygiene compliance rates will be reported on an annual basis. 

C. Difficile

What is C. difficile?

C. difficile (Clostridium difficile) is not new. Although people may associate it with health care settings, it doesn't come from hospitals, long-term care homes or laboratories.  It is widely distributed in the environment and can be found in the human intestine.  It can be picked up on the hands from exposure in the environment and can get into the stomach once the mouth is touched, or if food is handled and then swallowed.  Once in the stomach, the bacteria usually will not cause any problems unless the other bowel bacteria are disturbed. The use of antibiotics increases the chances of altering the normal level of good bacteria found in the intestines and colon.  Without the presence of the normal bacteria, the C. difficile bacteria may start to grow and produce a toxin that can lead to watery diarrhea, fever and abdominal pain or tenderness.

Who is at risk for C. difficile?

Healthy people are not usually susceptible to C. difficile.  Seniors, and people who have other illnesses or conditions being treated with antibiotics and certain other stomach medications are at greater risk of an infection from C. difficile.

Preventative Measures.

Washing hands thoroughly and often is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infectious diseases like C. difficile. Hand Hygiene is every ones responsibility - healthcare staff, physicians, volunteers, patients and visitors.  Lennox and Addington County General Hospital continually identifies areas for improvement and implements strategies to prevent C. difficile in our organization.  We are committed to patient safety and continuous improvement.

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

What is MRSA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that periodically lives on the skin and mucous membranes of healthy people. Occasional it can develop a resistance to certain antibiotics causing an infection. This is called Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA. MRSA is spread from one person to another by contact, usually on hands in contact with contaminated material by an infected person. MRSA can survive well on hands and can survive for weeks on inanimate objects such as door handles etc.

Who is at risk?

MRSA infection occurs most frequently among persons in hospital and health care facilities who have weakened immune systems such as elderly or very sick people.

Preventative Measures.

Health care providers and visitors should always practice good hand hygiene before and after patient contact. If a patient is known to have or had MRSA in the past additional infection control precautions are initiated.

Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE)

What is VRE?

Enterococci are germs that live in the gastrointestinal tract (bowels) of most individuals and generally do not cause harm. VRE are strains of enterococci that are resistant to the antibiotic Vancomycin. If a person has an infection caused by VRE, it may be more difficult to treat. VRE is spread from one person to another by contact, usually on the hands of caregivers.  VRE can be present on hands either from touching contaminated material excreted by an infected person or from touching articles soiled by feces.  VRE can survive well on hands and can survive for weeks on inanimate objects such as toilet seats, taps, door handles, bedrails, furniture.   

Preventative Measures.

Health care providers and visitors should always practice good hand hygiene before and after patient contact, after using the bathroom, blowing your nose, before handling food etc. VRE is easy to kill with the use of disinfectants. Single room accommodation will be provided for people with VRE infection. Family and visitors should not assist other patients with their personal care

Public reporting of our infection rates is important because it will allow us to work with a standardized approach across the province. 

Infection Rates


Feb.
2016 

Mar.
2016 

Apr.
2016 

 May.
2016;

 Jun.
2016 

 Jul.
2016
 Aug.
2016
 Sep.
2016

 Oct.
2016

 Nov.
2016
 Dec.
2016

 Jan.
2016

# of new cases of
C-difficile

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

rate/1000 patient days

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0

 0



 4th Quarter
Jan. 1, 2016 -
Mar. 31, 2016

 1st Quarter
Apr. 1, 2016 -
Jun. 30, 2016

 2nd Quarter
Jul. 1, 2016 -
Sep. 30, 2016

3rd Quarter
Oct. 1, 2016 -
Dec. 31, 2016

Number of new cases of MRSA

 0

 0

 0

0

MRSA rate/1000 patient days

 0

 0

 0

0

Number of new cases of VRE

 0

 0

 0

0

VRE rate/1000 patient days

 0

 0

 0

0


Hand Hygiene

Patient safety remains a priority for Lennox and Addington County General Hospital.  We have a number of practices in place to help prevent and control infections, including a comprehensive hand hygiene program.

We have recently introduced the provincial government's multifaceted hand hygiene program called "Just Clean Your Hands" promoting effective hand hygiene for patients, visitors and health care providers.

Beginning March 31, 2009, Ontario hospitals are required to publicly report annual hand hygiene compliance rates within their respective facilities.  This is achieved through first providing education to health care providers and support services, ensuring proper hand hygiene techniques are performed before and after patient environment contact.  Audits are then conducted as staff perform their daily activities, observing the number of times hand hygiene procedures are performed at each of these opportunities.

Compliance rates are calculated by dividing the number of times that hand hygiene was performed for each of the indications by the number of observed hand hygiene opportunities for that specific indication

Hand Hygiene Annual Compliance Rates


April 2016 - March 2017

Before initial patient environment contact

89.77%

After initial patient environment contact

96.48%

 Central Line Infection

What is Central Line-associated Infection?

A central venous catheter (or "line") is put into a patient's vein usually when a patient requires long-term access to medication, fluids or nutrition intravenously (through an IV).  A central line blood stream infection can occur when bacteria and/or fungi enters the blood stream, causing a patient to become sick.  The bacteria most often comes from the patient's skin but can come from a variety of places including wounds, and the environment.

What are the symptoms of CLI?

  • Redness, pain or swelling at or near the catheter site,
  • Pain or tenderness along the path of the catheter,
  • Drainage from the skin around the catheter, and
  • Sudden fever or chills

What are the Risk Factors for CLI?

Anyone who has a central line can get an infection.  There are many different causes for central line infection.  Infection control practices require that central lines are inserted into patients in a sterile environment using sterile equipment.  Measures are put in place to reduce the chances of contracting a central line infection.

How is CLI treated?

Treatment depends on the type of catheter, the severity of the infection and the patient's overall health.  Generally, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics to fight the infection and the central line may need to be removed.  In some cases, the line is flushed with high doses of antibiotics to kill the germs causing the infection so that the line does not have to be removed.

Surgical Safety Checklist

What is the Surgical Safety Checklist? 

Patient safety and quality improvement are priorities for our hospital.

June 1st, 2010 marked a very important day in the Operating Room as we implemented the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL).

The SSCL covers the most common tasks and items that operating room teams carry out by dialoguing at three key times during the OR experience: 1) before the patient is given anesthesia with all team members present, 2) before skin incision, and 3) while all team members are present before closing or end of procedure. At LACGH, the SSCL is completed for every procedure done in the Surgical Suite be it minor, major or endoscopy. It can be initiated by the anesthetist, surgeons or nursing staff…a true team effort.

Research has shown this practice to reduce risk of errors leading to complications and mortality.  The very nature of the checklist improves overall teamwork, communication and patient wellbeing.

Compliance with the SSCL is one of several safety indicators we must report monthly, and we strongly support the provincial government’s reporting regime. Implementing the mandatory use of the SSCL and publicly reporting it is another very useful step in helping hospitals monitor improved quality and patient safety efforts. 

Surgical Safety Checklist Compliance Rates


 4th Quarter
2015-16

 1st
Quarter
2016-17

 2nd
Quarter
2016-17

 3rd
Quarter
2016-17

Percentage of time Surgical Safety Checklist was completed for each procedure.

 100%

 100%

 100%

 100%

LACG Hospital Contact Info
8 Richmond Park Drive,
Napanee, ON K7R 2Z4
(613) 354-3301